EnvironmentGuides

It turns out our lawns can play a very significant role in the efforts to reduce the effects of global warming. Through the process of photosynthesis, grass takes in carbon dioxide and stores carbon in the soil. Recent studies at Ohio State University have shown that lawns can remove and store twice the amount of carbon from the air in a year then a tree can in 10.

There is an estimated 80 million home lawns in the U.S. covering an estimated 50 million acres, an area 3 times larger than the largest irrigated crop. It is estimated that up to 800 lbs of carbon per acre is sequestered by turfgrass each year; almost 1/2 ton per acre. This results in 20 million tons of carbon being removed from the atmosphere each year in the U. S. alone.

The cool sensation of walking barefoot through the grass is very real. Temperatures on lawn surfaces can be 10 to 14 degrees cooler than on concrete or asphalt. Green spaces can play a big role in modifying temperatures and controlling climate.

Through photosynthesis grass absorbs sunlight to produce energy. Grass plants will take in the Sun's heat during the day and release it slowly at night, helping to moderate temperatures.

Turf helps cool off surrounding areas through the evapotranspiration process. Lawn areas cool the air as water evaporates from the blades of grass. As much as 50% of the Sun's heat falling on the turf will be absorbed and eliminated through transpiration.

Our lawns cool off surrounding areas through the evapotranspiration process. Lawn areas cool the air as water evaporates from the blades of grass. As much as 50% of the Sun's heat falling on the turf will be absorbed and eliminated through transpiration.

Through photosynthesis grass absorbs sunlight to produce energy. Grass plants will take in the Sun's heat during the day and release it slowly at night, helping to moderate temperatures