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Better landscaping will usually help to sell a home faster.  It will help to make the house more sellable.

 

One of the easiest and most effective landscape renovations is the installation of a new lawn.  Removing that old, worn out lawn and replacing it with a beautiful new lawn can make a great first impression and really help showcase your property.

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Posted in Sod By Mark Leonard

Preparation is the key to installing a new lawn. To grow a great lawn you will need to optimize on site growing conditions. The soil must be prepped and made ready for sod. Sprinkler systems need to be tested and heads adjusted. Don’t make the sod wait to be installed, have everything on site ready before the sod arrives. Use this checklist for a smooth and successful new lawn installation.         

 

 

 

1.  Rototill existing ground

Rototill existing soil 4 to 6 " deep

 

2.  Add organic matter

Add 3 cu yds of Organics per 1,000 sq ft of area to be sodded and rototill in

 

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Posted in Sod By Mark Leonard

Q.  What type of grass do you grow?

A.  We produce two varieties. Eco-turf and Sun and Shade. You can find product descriptions and info on our products page. Our Eco-turf is a blend of improved varieties of bluegrass. Sun & Shade is a mixture of bluegrass and tall fescue. 

Q.  Is bluegrass a poor choice for Colorado?

A.  Bluegrass is ideally suited for the semi- arid climate of Colorado. It is both heat and cold tolerant, recuperates from heavy traffic and very drought resistant.

 

Q.  Do you have a grass that grows in shady areas?

 A.  Our Sun and Shade variety contains turf type tall fescue that does well in shade.

 

Q.  What kind of grass is best for Colorado?

A.  ScienTurfic Eco-Turf is a cool season grass that is suited for high elevations, cool nighttime temperatures, and cold winters will do best in the Colorado climate.

 

   
                                                                                          


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Posted in Sod By Mark Leonard

 

Low volume sprinkler heads apply larger drops of water at a much

slower rate than traditional spay heads.

 

This allows  more time for water to soak in with little to no runoff

and will help to reduce water loss from wind drift.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

Fall is the most important time of the year to fertilize your lawn. Fertilizing only in the spring or the summer will deprive your lawn of the extended benefits of fall fertilization.

 

During the summer the grass plant produces energy from photosynthesis that it uses for top growth. As temperatures drop in the fall root growth is favored over plant growth. Energy that the plant produces in the fall is used for root growth. Excess energy is stored in the roots for future use.  This storage of energy means better winter survival and earlier spring green up without the extra mowing that comes with spring fertilization.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

It is better to water less often but for longer periods of time to allow water to penetrate deeper into the soil. 

This will promote deeper root growth.

A lawn with a more extensive root system will need to be watered less often, being able to reach moisture that is available deeper in the soil.

 

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

Growing grass scientifically

 

It began over 40 yrs ago with a pair of schoolteachers and an idea; a vision to grow a perfect grass scientifically. This was the beginning of Scien-Turfic Sod, a Colorado sod farm that continues to produce turf grasses for those who demand quality. As the most widely recognized grower of turf grasses in Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region, ScienTurfic has been growing great lawns for over 4 decades with its environmentally friendly and drought resistant blends of hybrid grasses.

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Posted in Sod By Mark Leonard

To prevent run off, especially on slopes, water twice a day, but for less time.

 

Set each zone to run for 1/2 the normal run time, and then cycle through each zone a second time for 1/2 the normal run time.

 

This will allow water to penetrate deeper into the soil and not run off.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

Waiting too long between mowings can cause the grass to grow too long. If the grass blade becomes too long it will cease to support it's own weight and begin to fall over.

 

This will cause the underlying grass to become smothered and even die. The grass will begin to thin out and be more susceptible to disease

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

1.  Don't water every day

Watering every day will result in a lawn with shallow root systems. Lawns do not need to be watered every day or even every other day.  Overwatering only wastes water. Watering too frequently discourages the grass from developing the deep root system it needs to take in the water available deeper in the soil in order to become less dependent on supplemental watering.

 

2.  Water early in the morning or late in evening

Not watering during the hottest part of the day will keep the moisture in the soil longer and help to lessen water lost due to evaporation.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

Grass should always be cut according to its rate of growth.

 

 It will grow faster during the cooler months of Spring and Fall, requiring more frequent mowing during times of rapid growth.

 

In the hot months of Summer, as built in survival mechanisms tell the grass to go dormant, it begins to slow down it's growth and will require less frequent mowing.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

Listen to your Mother;  Mother Nature that is.  The fact is most lawns are overwatered.

We need to listen to what nature is telling us. We have become too dependent on our sprinkler systems, not observing what is really going on in the natural world. The grass will tell us what it needs.

Although sprinkler systems are more efficient in applying water to lawn areas than we can be dragging a hose around the yard, they do not make adjustments for actual climatic conditions. They just keep on watering, day after day, week after week, whether the grass really needs it or not. A set watering schedule may work best for us, but quite often  is not in synch with the needs of the grass.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

Lawns do not need to be watered every day.

 

Overwatering only wastes water.

 

 Watering too frequently discourages the grass from developing  the deep root system it needs to take in the water available deeper in the soil. 

 

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

 

 Change the direction and pattern each time you mow.

 

If you mow repeatedly in the same direction, the  mower tends to push the grass over rather than cut it cleanly.

 

Eventually the grass begins to lean in the direction mowed.

 

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

Shady areas will need less water than sunny areas.

South facing areas will dry out faster than north facing areas.

Sloped areas will need to be watered differently than flat areas.

It is important to vary the amount of water applied according to conditions in each area.

Set run times for each sprinkler zone individually to account for the different water needs of each area covered.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

When it comes to lawn care, many homeowners repeat the same bad practices year after year.  Here are a few to avoid.

1.  Scalping the lawn to start the season.

Mowing grass too short is very harmful to the plant and can actually put it into shock. Cutting off too much of the grass blade will limit it's ability to absorb sunshine (known as photosynthesis) through it's leaves. This will make the plant less healthy and more prone to disease. Cutting the grass too short also encourages the weeds to grow as there is now less competition for the same space.  Observe areas where use of a weed eater has scalped the grass almost down to the dirt and notice how the weeds take over in these areas.  A nice healthy, thick lawn will crowd out many of the weeds and is always the best weed prevention.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

It is widely believed that cutting the grass short will cause it to grow slower.

Cutting it too short will restrict it's ability to absorb sunshine.

This will only cause it to grow even faster until it produces a blade long enough to absorb the sunshine necessary to store energy and remain healthy.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

Automatic sprinkler systems are designed to use water in the most efficient way possible, but if used improperly they can also waste more water than they were designed to save.  A few simple and common sense adjustments can mean big water savings.

Adjust sprinkler clock settings for time of year

The biggest way most homeowners waste water is by not setting their sprinkler clocks properly. Grass needs far less water in the spring and fall than during the heat of the summer. Yet most homeowners only set the sprinkler clock once in the spring.  It continues to water the same, rain or shine, hot or cold.  This results in the grass getting way too much water when it doesn't need it and not enough when it could really use it.


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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard

It turns out our lawns can play a very significant role in the efforts to reduce the effects of global warming. Through the process of photosynthesis, grass takes in carbon dioxide and stores carbon in the soil. Recent studies at Ohio State University have shown that lawns can remove and store twice the amount of carbon from the air in a year than a tree can in 10.

There is an estimated 80 million home lawns in the U.S. covering an estimated 50 million acres, an area 3 times larger than the largest irrigated crop. It is estimated that up to 800 lbs of carbon per acre is sequestered by Turfgrass each year; almost 1/2 ton per acre. This results in 20 million tons of carbon being removed from the atmosphere each year in the U. S. alone.

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Posted in Environment By Mark Leonard

Replace or sharpen mower blades before the first  mowing of the season. 

Mowing with dull blades will shred the tips of the grass blades causing “white tipping” of the grass. 

Torn grass blades are more susceptible to disease. Sharp blades will ensure a clean cut.

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Posted in Lawn Care By Mark Leonard